North Korea 'really angry' at USA as tensions rise

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In August, Trump canceled Pompeo's planned trip to Pyongyang, citing a lack of progress in North Korea's denuclearization.

North Korea has long sought U.S. recognition as a nuclear state and guarantees for the survival of the generational Kim regime, which human rights groups consider one of the most repressive in the world.

The State Department had earlier confirmed that Pompeo would meet Kim Yong Chol, a close aide of Kim, in NY to discuss progress toward a denuclearisation pact and to arrange a second summit following the historic talks between Trump and Kim in June.

North Korea is getting increasingly angry at the United States, as talks are deadlocked and tensions between the two countries are on the rise, a source familiar with the discussions told CNN.

"There have been cases in the past when US-North Korea talks were delayed, so there is no need to shift between hope and fear", a senior ministry official told reporters.

Trump played down the delay in Pompeo's meeting with Kim Yong Chol, a right-hand man of North Korea's leader, and said it was a scheduling issue. We think it's going fine.

During a press conference on Wednesday mostly focused on midterm US elections, Trump contended that he had made more progress with North Korea than past administrations, and said that with sanctions still in place, he was not in a hurry to reach a deal with Pyongyang, which has halted nuclear and missile tests for the past year.

The statement did not threaten to end nuclear negotiations, however, and the North Koreans are said to still be pursuing a second summit between President Trump and Kim Jong Un.

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To that end, the USA and South Korea announced last week the creation of a new working group to "strengthen our close coordination", including on "sanctions implementation and inter-Korean cooperation that comply with the United Nations sanctions", according to State Department deputy spokesperson Robert Palladino.

Asked about earlier remarks by U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman Gen. Joseph Dunford that Washington will have to make "some changes to the military posture" if negotiations with North Korea make progress, JCS spokesman Patrick Ryder told Voice of America that it is not considering scaling down its defense posture in South Korea.

While both the US and South Korea all want peace and stability in the Korea peninsula, there is a "fear" that fast-developing inter-Korean relations may get out of step with Washington, according to former USA officials and experts.

On Sunday, Pompeo said he was "not worried" about the North Korean demands and insisted there would be "no economic relief until we have achieved our ultimate objective".

"It's a lot easier when the North Koreans are misbehaving, that tends to promote solidarity between Washington and Seoul", Russel said.

Kim and Trump signed an agreement at their landmark summit in June to rid the Korean Peninsula of nuclear weapons, but the two sides have been at odds over the pace of Pyongyang's efforts to end its nuclear weapons program.

"The immediate priorities of reconciliation, family visit, and potential for infrastructure and trade between North and South [Korea] look a lot different from Seoul and from Washington as does the global non-proliferation agenda", he added.

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