Michigan, Missouri, Utah voters opt to loosen marijuana laws

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North Dakota's Measure 3, which would have made it legal for anyone over the age of 21 to use the drug, was losing by a margin of 60 percent to 40 percent with 357 out of 424 precincts reporting, according to the secretary of state's website. The latter is the only state that does not authorize marijuana stores.

MI voters legalized recreational marijuana use for residents over the age of 21 with retail sales of the product subject to a 10 percent tax. In Utah, meanwhile, Gov. Gary Herbert said he would ask lawmakers to work on a bill legalizing medical marijuana if voters reject Proposition 2 at the polls Tuesday.

One example of a possible timeline for MI comes from Colorado: Voters approved recreational marijuana in November 2012, but it didn't officially become legal to sell until 2014. Possession of marijuana by minors would be treated the same as possession of alcohol. Any amount greater than 2.5 ounces must be stored under lock and key.

It also changes the current related violations from crimes to civil infractions.

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Municipalities previously had to "opt in" to allow dispensaries but under the Proposal 1, municipalities have to "opt out".

Proposal 1 allows cities and towns to regulate, ban, or limit the number of marijuana businesses in the community. Following in Colorado's footsteps, the proposal will allow adults 21 and over to purchase and possess weed, and will tax cannabis products.

Selling marijuana without a license, or selling marijuana to a minor, would still be criminal and would hold the same harsh penalties as today. Supporters say it will raise roughly $130 million in additional tax revenue each year that will go toward road repairs, schools and local governments.

Voters in MI voted for Proposal 1, which legalizes recreational marijuana and regulates it like alcohol.

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