NASA’s sea ice survey captures freakish, perfectly rectangular iceberg

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A freaky iceberg has been spotted by NASA scientists - in the shape of a near-perfect rectangle.

An enormous, perfectly rectangular iceberg has been discovered floating in the Antarctic by NASA scientists.

The US space agency said the object's sharp angles and flat surface suggested it had recently broken away from an ice shelf.

Tabular icebergs are wide and flat and long - "like sheet cake" - Kelly Brunt, an ice scientist with NASA, told Live Science journal. They're usually formed when breaking off from ice shelves; in this case, it likely came from the deteriorating Larsen C-the same shelf that saw a 2,200 square-mile, trillion-ton iceberg break away a year ago.

"We get two types of icebergs".

"We get two types of icebergs: We get the type that everyone can envision in their head that sank the Titanic, and they look like prisms or triangles at the surface and you know they have a insane subsurface", Kelly Brunt, an ice scientist with NASA, told Live Science.

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Speaking to LiveScience, University of Maryland Earth scientist Kelly Brunt compared calving events to a long fingernail that eventually snaps off at the end; the process often results in seemingly ideal geometric edges.

But it's now on the move, according to Professor Mark Brandon of the Open University - who says the iceberg "will not be stopped easily".

"What makes this one a bit unusual is that it looks nearly like a square", she told the LiveScience website.

And then there's the iceberg photographed last week by NASA's Operation IceBridge team.

As with all icebergs, the part visible above the surface is just the top 10 percent of its mass.

'Sentinel-1 SAR satellite imagery from 29 August 2018 shows that to the north of the iceberg the wind is pushing the sea ice northwards faster than the iceberg is rotating.

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