Space Station astronaut captures mammoth Hurricane Florence from directly above

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It's chilling, even from space.

Astronaut Alexander Gerst also joined in the fun, explaining that the fearless space men and women need wide-lense cameras to take these incredible photos.

To show the size and power of the storm, a number of photos taken Monday from the International Space Station and astronaut Ricky Arnold show Florence's girth as the storm churns across the Atlantic Ocean.

In the first tweet, Alexander Gerst shared images of the Hurricane Florence's eye as the "no-kidding nightmare" storm is swirling above the Atlantic Ocean.

More news: More than 20,000 on NC coast already without power from Florence gusts

Because Hurricane Florence is so unbelievably massive, astronauts had to use a super wide-angle lens to capture photographs of the monstrous storm from space. The hurricane is expected to reach 150 miles per hour before landfall Thursday night.

The ISS was flying 255 miles (410 kilometers) above the storm when it got the footage, which NASA describes as "dramatic".

HO/AFP/Getty Images In this September 12, 2018 photo provided by NASA, hurricane Florence churns over the Atlantic Ocean heading for the US east coast as seen from the International Space Station.

North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper said the impact of the storm would be widespread, hitting the coast early Friday morning. She has worked as a senior manager in public relations and communications for major telecommunication companies, and is the former Deputy Director for Media Relations with the Modern Coalition.

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