Hurricane Florence expected To Be 'catastrophic'

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Winds: Sustained or frequent winds gusts up to or in excess of 74 miles per hour are possible in the Hurricane Watch area Friday. Tropical storm-force winds are forecast to hit the Carolinas Thursday evening, according to Business Insider.

Hurricane Florence is predicted to bring "catastrophic flash flooding" to parts of North and SC, along with strong winds and a massive storm surge.

As of 11 p.m. ET Wednesday, the storm was centred 455 kilometres east-southeast of Wilmington, N.C., moving northwest at 28 km/h.

Florence is moving northwest at about 10 miles per hour.

There was some good news overnight.

A spokesperson for the ABC affiliate said that roads around the building were flooding.

The station said on Facebook that it was broadcasting its sister station WPDE-TV's coverage of the storm.

Florence is already making its presence felt along the coast of North Carolina.

As the crews gathered near the State Capitol in Raleigh on Thursday, dozens of trucks clogged the parking lots and lined the streets.

With Duke Energy expecting up to 3 million power outages for its 4 million customers, power companies will need an extra hand. Workers are being brought in from the Midwest and Florida to help in the storm's aftermath, it said.

UPDATE 5 p.m.: Hurricane Florence's forward speed has slowed to 5 miles per hour as it approaches the Carolinas as a Category 2 hurricane with 105 miles per hour winds.

"Watch out, America! #HurricaneFlorence is so enormous, we could only capture her with a super wide-angle lens from the @Space_Station, 400 km directly above the eye", German astronaut Alexander Gerst tweeted. And newly formed Subtropical Storm Joyce is not expected to threaten land soon. That's enough to fill more than 15 million Olympic-size swimming pools.

More news: Hurricane Florence Loses Steam, but Shifting Forecast Predicts Huge Rainfall

Governor Roy Cooper requested the added disaster declaration on Thursday (local time) because he anticipates what his office calls "historic major damage" across the state from the hurricane.

"There is some damage ... but it is still standing strong".

"I'm not going to put our personnel in harm's way, especially for people that we've already told to evacuate", Wrightsville Beach Police Chief Dan House said.

The center is now about 100 miles from North Carolina. They also have three dogs and three parrots.

And there's no way her family could afford that - or the $1,728 per room another hotel quoted. I'm glad we both came to the decision ourselves. "He is the only caregiver to me and my son", Browning said. We've assembled a list of options below and will update it as we find more. One emergency official said it will be a "Mike Tyson punch" to the area. It's a kind gesture but doesn't alleviate Browning's fear. I think it's a great compromise.

Browning said she had started a GoFundMe campaign in case repairs are needed for the family home. As many as 1.5 million people are believed to live within mandatory evacuation zones.

Southwest Virginia, West Virginia, the Ohio River Valley, and western and central Pennsylvania all have a chance of rain from Florence's remnants on Monday and Tuesday that could lead to flash flooding, depending on where the heaviest rainfall rates develop.

If the European model is true or the overall trend persists, University of Miami hurricane researcher Brian McNoldy said it "is exceptionally bad news, as it smears a landfall out over hundreds of miles of coastline, most notably the storm surge".

Thousands more have been ordered to prepare to deploy if needed.

Farther from the epicenter, surges between 6-to-9 feet are expected near Myrtle Beach and Ocracoke Inlet.

His bustling pizza restaurant is one of the few businesses open in the evacuated town. "It's going to happen". "Storms like that don't usually make it that far west".

Cooper and his SC counterpart, Henry McMaster, told the more than 1 million people who have been told to leave that if they don't, they are on their own.

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