Partisan Divide Deepens Over Trump’s Supreme Court Pick

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Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) said today that if any Republicans break ranks on the Supreme Court nomination of federal appeals court judge Brett Kavanaugh, he doesn't expect any endangered Democrats to cross over and vote for confirmation.

US Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh reportedly racked up a tens of thousands of dollars in credit card bills, some of which were due to his spending on Washington Nationals season tickets for himself and a "handful" of friends, according to financial disclosures and the White House.

Kavanaugh, known to be a baseball fan, was paid back by his friends and retired the debt in 2017. He said some of the debts were for unspecified home improvements.

On Wednesday, the former press secretary for Hillary Clinton's 2016 campaign told ABC's Powerhouse Politics podcast hosts Jonathan Karl and Rick Klein that "there's more than a million pages of documents" from Kavanaugh's time working under President George W. Bush.

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Kavanaugh sat on a panel that heard a challenge to the Clean Power Plan in 2016, and Carlson says he made clear in oral arguments that he believed the EPA overstepped its authority in establishing the rule. Judges aren't required to disclose this information. He said the attacks on Kavanaugh, which in the media have included attacks on his first name and his ethnicity, are an "extreme" distortion of his record.

While one national political analyst said McCain, who has been in Arizona since late past year battling brain cancer, may be willing to give up his seat if it would help Kavanaugh be confirmed, another Arizona lawmaker has different thoughts. Kavanaugh has a habit of going into debt, presumably to watch baseball, and also reported $60,000 to $200,000 in 2006, the year he was confirmed as an appellate judge. The Court's newest justice, Neil Gorsuch, reported assets worth between $3.6 million to $10.5 million in his most recent filings.

"Any judge who demonstrated hostility to Roe would not be a person that I could vote for".

In the era before the Roe vs. Wade opinion from the Supreme Court legalized abortion throughout the nation, some women would use wire coat hangers in an attempt to abort their fetuses.

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