JLR to move Land Rover Discovery production from United Kingdom to Slovakia

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Jaguar Land Rover has announced an overhaul of its United Kingdom manufacturing operations, revealing plans for a new family of Range Rover models, and the moving of Discovery production to JLR's new facility in Nitra, Slovakia.

The company warned that there may be some job losses in the United Kingdom as a result.

Why is Land Rover moving Discovery production to Slovakia? While the company has said it will be investing further in Solihull, where the new Range Rover and Range Rover Sports will be built, the announcement was seized upon by critics of Brexit, who argued it pointed to the impact that concerns around Britain's exit from the European Union was already having on business and investment decisions.

Last month, the company - which is owned by India's Tata Motors, said fourth-quarter pre-tax profit halved to £364million on revenues of £7.6billion. The investment in the United Kingdom facilities is said to be in the "hundreds of millions".

"The new, award winning Range Rover Velar was an important contributor". The Solihull plant employs around 10,000 staff, and between 500 and 1,000 agency staff.

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He added: 'This significant investment and technology upgrade in Solihull in order to accommodate our next-generation of flagship Land Rover models, and the refit of our Halewood plant for the next Evoque, is proof we remain committed both to the United Kingdom and to transformation and growth'.

JLR has previously said its next-generation Discovery will be built at its Slovakia plant and on Monday announced there could be some job cuts in Britain as a result.

The British report added that although Land Rover had yet to indicate whether the upcoming second-generation Evoque would be offered in coupé guise, this latest development suggested it "almost certainly" wouldn't be. 'This multi-plant approach mirrors the strategy taken for Range Rover Evoque and Land Rover Discovery Sport at our plants in Halewood, China and Brazil, ensuring our manufacturing output is able to keep up with strong consumer demand, ' said Wolfgang Stadler, global manufacturing director.

In the short-term, more work than anticipated will move to JLR's new £1bn facility in Nitra, Slovakia, which is due to open at the end of the year.

David Bailey, the professor of industrial strategy at Aston University, said it has raised hopes that the JLR's first electric vehicle - the I-Pace - will be built in Britain.

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