California reaches all-time high in sexually transmitted diseases

Share

California reached a record high in the number of sexually transmitted disease cases last year, with the state seeing an overall 45 percent spike in the number of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis cases over the past five years.

The Golden State has seen a almost 45 percent increase in three of the most serious STD's - syphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhea - since five years ago: 300,000 such cases in 2017.

CDPH noted that 2017 was the "fifth consecutive year for increases in the number of infants born with congenital syphilis", and that there were 278 congenital syphilis cases, including 30 stillbirths, in California last year.

See the CDPH's breakdown of the data here. More than 2 million new cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis were reported in 2016, the most recent year for which statistics are available, according to the wire service. Gonorrhea cases saw a 16 percent increase in the same time frame but affected twice as many men than women.

The figure that caused the greatest alarm for researchers and administrators was 30 stillbirths resulting from congenital syphilis statewide - the highest number reported since 1995, the CDPH said.

The state health agency says it's working with local health departments and other organizations throughout the state to raise awareness about STDs. "So in San Francisco, we recommend young women 25 and under get screened for chlamydia and gonorrhea every year with their provider".

More news: Knights dump Jets to even conference final, take home-ice advantage

Read the full report from the California Department of Public Health here.

California has reached an all-time high in sexually transmitted diseases. African-Americans had early-syphilis rates two-times higher than whites.

The report showed there were 218,710 cases of chlamydia and 75,450 cases of gonorrhea previous year. Many people with STD do not know they have it.

That latter stat is particularly troubling to public health officials given the long-term dangers of untreated syphilis, which can cause brain damage.

"Regular testing and treatment are very important for people who are sexually active, even for people who have no symptoms", Smith added.

"For California to have a steady increase in congenital syphilis is shameful", Dr. Jeffrey Klausner, a professor of medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, told the Associated Press.

Share