'Hallmarks of genocide' in Myanmar: UN expert

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She said development was "sorely needed" in Rakhine, one of Myanmar's poorest states, but that it "must benefit everyone in the state regardless of their ethnicity, not entrench the existing system of apartheid against Rohingya people".

Evidence of Myanmar's ethnic cleansing campaign against the Rohingya minority continues to mount as Amnesty International revealed the Burmese military is now conducting a "land grab" of areas where the besieged community used to live. At least three new such facilities are reportedly under construction.

The Special Rapporteur said she hoped to make official visits to India and China as part of her preparation to report to the General Assembly later this year, and said she remained hopeful the Myanmar Government would revisit its decision and grant her access. "There are only police posts for regional security and law enforcement reasons".

The report comes on the heels of a similar investigation published by Human Rights Watch in February, in which the organization alleged Myanmar's forces were demolishing Rohingya villages in order to erase any proof of human rights abuses that may have been committed in Rakhine.

Myanmar is allegedly building military bases on the top of razed Rohingya villages, where the Rohingyas once lived before their persecution by the country's security forces in August a year ago. "As far as the Myanmar situation is concerned, social media is Facebook, and Facebook is social media", he said.

Nearly six months after launching the military operation, Myanmar's military has admitted to only killing 10 captured Rohingya men, who, it claims, were "terrorists".

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The new Amnesty report, "Remaking Rakhine State", uses satellite imagery and interviews to point to a rapid increase in military infrastructure and other construction since the start of the year that researchers say amounts to a "land grab".

"The bulldozing of entire villages is incredibly worrying", said Tirana Hassan of Amnesty International.

Satellite imagery also shows how new refugee reception centres - meant to "welcome" Rohingya who return from Bangladesh - are surrounded by security fences and close to areas with a heavy presence of military and border guard personnel. Not only have ir homes been destroyed, but new constructions dehumanize even more discrimination y already suffered, "says Hassan". Meanwhile, Myanmar and Bangladesh have signed a repatriation deal, though it has not begun yet.

A top United Nations human rights official had previously said Myanmar's targeting of the Rohingya appears to be "textbook ethnic cleansing".

But ARSA's rise was just as sudden as their withdrawal, and their actions have effectively led to Myanmar launching a campaign which has seen around 700,000 Rohingya people kicked out of their own country and forced to find refuge in Bangladesh.

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