Federal government urged to take action on dumped steel and aluminum

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The president of the Canadian Steel Producers Association says Canada may be off the hook for now from American steel and aluminum tariffs but it is still at risk from a glut of foreign steel.

Canada, the biggest supplier of steel and aluminum to the United States, escaped Trump's import duties along with Mexico, but the two countries could still face duties if they fail to reach a deal with the Trump administration on modernizing the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau acknowledged on Monday that he personally reassured U.S. President Donald Trump last week that Canada won't become a transit station for offshore steel and aluminum into the U.S. market.

Joseph Galimberti says Canada has to work very quickly to identify possible attempts to circumvent the US tariffs by sneaking steel in through Canada and must be prepared to act to stop this.

His comments came amid rising global trade tensions in the wake of a USA decision to impose steep tariffs on imported steel and aluminum.

"There's a lot of steel out there looking for a home", said Herman.

Canada's Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland termed the two things "separate issues", while Mexico's economy ministry said "the negotiation of the NAFTA should not be subject to conditions outside the process".

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Mr. Trump has threatened to expand the steel and aluminum duties to the two countries if there is no progress on meeting US demands in the negotiations on the North American free-trade agreement.

Executives in the steel-processing sector describe the manner in which countries and importers get around tariffs as being akin to a sheet of paper.

Mr. Trudeau argued that Canada - the largest supply list of steel to the United States - is a key American defence ally and noted Canadian steel is used to manufacture USA tanks and Canadian aluminum is in America warplanes. The tour was planned before the tariff exemption was confirmed but will still go ahead despite the exemption, with stops in Alma., Que, Hamilton, Ont., Sault Ste.

Trump signed the proclamation on those tariffs last week and the exemption given Canada was a last-minute victory for the Canadian government.

She is to meet US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, Congressional leaders and others. Marie, Ont., and Regina, Sask.

The Canadian government has vowed to retaliate if duties are imposed, but the prime minister did not answer directly when asked what measures it might take.

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