Donald Trump blames video games for violence, Trevor Noah responds


President Donald Trump will meet with video game industry representatives Thursday to discuss video games as instigators of violence in real life.

While there are studies which claim violent video games are "exemplary teachers of aggression", other studies which also support a connection between an aggressive emotional state and video games suggest the emotions don't lead to physical violence.

Less than 24 hours after the White House uploaded it to YouTube, the gory and ultra-violent video has been viewed more than 600,000 times.

However, the Washington Post reports that Brent Bozell, president of the Media Research Council, has said that he thinks that video games need "tougher regulation", going on to say they need "to be given the same kind of thought as tobacco and liquor".

The comedian reinforced his point, saying, "I've been playing a ton of Angry Birds, so I've gotta go outside and throw some pigeons at pigs". Zenimax owns the studios behind the Fallout series and Doom, while Take-Two owns the studio behind the Grand Theft Auto franchise.

In 2013, after the shooting at Sandy Hook elementary school in Newtown, Conn., Vice President Joe Biden held three days of wide-ranging talks on gun violence prevention, including a meeting with video game industry executives.

In 2011, the Supreme Court rejected a California law banning the sale of violent video games to children.

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However, one attendee and ex-White House official found the Trump administration's meeting to be a slapdash and agenda-driven event at best and an attempt to antagonize the industry at worst.

"Blaming video games for violence in the real world is no more productive than blaming the news media for bringing violent crime into our homes night after night", argues the ESA, the industry's trade group, in materials it provides online. In his book Assassination Generation, Grossman stated that video games "depict antisocial, misanthropic, casually savage behavior can warp the mind - with potentially deadly results".

Researches have been failed since decades to accentuate the association of gun violence to the graphic depictions of violence being seen in different video games as well as movies.

The goal of the meeting will be 'to discuss violent video-game exposure and the correlation to aggression and desensitization in children, ' White House spokeswoman Lindsay Walters said. Many studies that have attempted to find such a correlation does exist, but none have ever been successful in finding an actual link between the two. Noah pointed out how weird it is that video games are only credited with influencing youths in this one specific way.

According to Rolling Stone, the video shocked some attendees - though, not any of the game makers.

ESA's Michael Gallagher and ESRB's Patricia Vance have spent years in debating and defending the First Amendment rights of the video games and the effectiveness of the game industry rating system.