NASA breaks record for pictures taken farthest from Earth

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NASA's New Horizons spacecraft broke a record of farthest images captured in space, taking photos from a distance of 3.79 billion miles away from Earth.

"New Horizons has always been a mission of firsts - first to explore Pluto, first to explore the Kuiper Belt, fastest spacecraft ever launched", New Horizons Principal Investigator Alan Stern, of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado, notes in a statement.

The image, which to the naked eye just looks like an eery green glow in between some cloud looking things, is actually something much cooler.

"New Horizons has always been a mission of firsts - first to explore Pluto, first to explore the Kuiper Belt, fastest spacecraft ever launched", said New Horizons Principal Investigator Alan Stern of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado.

"New Horizons has always been a mission of firsts", the mission's principle investigator Alan Stern said, "First to explore Pluto, first to explore the Kuiper Belt, fastest spacecraft ever launched".

For a couple of hours, this New Horizons image of the so-called Wishing Well star cluster, snapped on December 5, 2017, was the farthest image ever captured by a spacecraft. In the middle of this year will start a monitoring campaign, the details of which we wrote earlier, and while New Horizons is in hibernation mode, which will last until June of this year.

Image of the "Wishing Well" star cluster, taken December 5, 2017, which temporarily broke the 27-year record set by Voyager 1.

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And, just hours later, it beat its own record.

This color image of the Earth, dubbed Pale Blue Dot, is a part of the first ever "family portrait" of our Solar System taken by Voyager 1.

NASA has published a pair of record-breaking photos.

At the time, New Horizons was 3.79 billion miles (6.12 billion kilometers) from Earth. Voyager 1 shut off its camera the same year it captured the "Pale Blue Dot" image and Voyager 2 shut down its cameras after imaging Neptune in 1989.

According to NASA, New Horizons is now the fifth spacecraft to fly beyond the outer planets of our solar system.

"Those are the farthest out images ever taken", says Dr. Andy Cheng, with the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel. Each of those show a Kuiper Belt object: The one on the left is known as 2012 HZ84, and on the right is 2012 HE85. At the time of shooting the space station was at a distance of 6.12 billion kilometers from Earth. These objects include dwarf planets like Pluto in far-out orbits of the sun and former KBOs in unstable orbits known as "Centaurs".

New Horizons is now traveling about 700,000 miles (1.1M km) every single day.

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