Is Cheese Good For You? New Study Points To Heart Benefits

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In the study, too much cheese was found to be as negative as too little, with the sweet spot hitting around 40 grams a day (about the size of a matchbook).

In a new meta-analysis, researchers from China and the Netherlands analyzed 15 studies encompassing more than 200,000 people about the health effects of cheese.

They concluded that those who regularly ate cheese cut their chances of having a stroke by 10% and chances of developing certain coronary heart diseases by 14%. All but one of the studies excluded people with existing heart disease, and all but two tracked people for 10 years or more.

Well, sort of. The study explains that, as with anything, moderation is key.

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Eating cheese daily may cut risk of heart attack and stroke, new study suggests

The researchers believe that cheese's calcium stops fat being absorbed by the body while raising levels of good cholesterol. (But the findings were) certainly different from what people might expect.

It's important to understand that the relationship between higher cheese consumption and lower risk of heart disease and stroke is U-shaped rather than linear. Now, cheese-lovers can sleep well knowing that their midnight snack or post-night-out cheese fry indulgence is actually good for them. "No one's saying you should definitely go out and eat 40 grams of cheese a day".

The attention of specialists was attracted by the fact that the people of France, who usually consume fat-rich food, including cheeses, relatively rarely suffer from heart diseases. This doesn't mean you should start eating a block of cheese, or slices of pizza every day, because cheese does have high levels of saturated fat, that is linked to high cholesterol and poor lipid profiles. "But on the upside, a bit of cheese on a cracker doesn't sound unreasonable", Stewart said. But the benefits outweigh the bad when it comes to cheese.

"We're always are searching for ways to minimize heart disease and reduce atherosclerosis", he says.

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