Nearly 20 Percent Of 2016 Race Hate Crimes Were 'Anti-White'

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There were 6,121 documented hate crimes in the US last year, compared to 5,850 in 2015.

The FBI specified that about 58 percent of hate crimes in 2016 were motivated by racial prejudice, with more than half of those incidents targeting black Americans.

Hate crimes in Maryland, however, have decreased 14 percent, according to the data.

1,218 hate crimes were based on bias against certain sexual orientations.

Going forward. The FBI, through its UCR Program, will continue to collect and disseminate information on hate crime-as a means to educate and increase awareness of these types of crimes for the public as well as for law enforcement, government, community leaders, civic organizations, and researchers around the country.

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Six police departments reported a hate crime in 2016, including Atlanta, Conyers, the University of Georgia, along with Cobb, Fulton and Gwinnett County police.

The law center and other watchdog groups have blamed the spike in extremist groups and hate speech to the divisive presidential election previous year.

According to The Huffington Post, the Federal Bureau of Investigation report is the most complete information on hate crimes in the divisive election year 2016, and supports data from the Southern Poverty Law Center, which documented a wave of such events in months after elections. But the number of anti-black crimes remained about even with the number reported in 2015.

Of the 7,615 overall victims, 4,720 were victims of crimes against persons (both adults and juveniles), 2,813 were victims of crimes against property, and 82 were victims of hate crimes categorized as crimes against society (e.g., weapons violations, drug offenses, gambling). Hate incidents increased from 203 in 2015 to 285 in 2016. A report from the department's hate crimes task force is due next year, but Mr. Sessions noted noted other steps being taken in the meantime - highlighting the DOJ's decision to appoint a prosecutor from the civil rights division to assist prosecution of a man accused of killing a transgender teenager.

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