Facebook pilots new revenge porn measures in Australia

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The pilot has officially launched in Australia, and is going to roll out in the US, UK and right here in Canada. "They're not storing the image, they're storing the link", Grant replied to concerns about who at Facebook is seeing this material. This can be a positive step towards a ban on revenge porn in world's largest social media platform "Facebook".

Facebook's Head of Global Safety, Antigone Davis, said the pilot is an industry first, and builds on the non-consensual intimate images tool announced by Facebook in April that uses cutting-edge technology to prevent the re-sharing of images on its platforms.

Once that happens, Facebook's analysts "hash" the image, storing a unique fingerprint which prevents further instances being uploaded and shared.

Facebook is testing an unusual way to put an end to revenge porn - they need your intimate images to do it. The company is doing this to tackle revenge porn and give some control back to victims of this type of abuse.

Earlier this year leaked documents revealed 54,000 cases of revenge porn are dealt with by Facebook each month.

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The ABC has reported that Facebook is partnering with the Australia Government's Office of the eSafety Commissioner for the pilot test.

She added the hash can not be turned back into an image.

Users will be asked to send the imagery to themselves on Messenger while the eSafety Commissioner's office notifies Facebook of their submission.

If someone suspects they've been hacked or someone will post sensitive photos without their consent, the victim can preempt the "image-based assault" by filling out a form and uploading a photo to their self via Messenger.

It's definitely worth thinking about how to hack proof your life but the good news is that Facebook are finally climbing onboard, too. We look forward to getting feedback and learning.

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