Meek Mill's Lawyer Will Fight The Rapper's Prison Sentence

Share

He failed a urine test, had an altercation at St. Louis airport which violated his traveling restrictions, and posted a video of himself riding through the streets of New York City on his dirt bike.

Meek Mill was convicted on drug and gun charges in 2008 but released in 2009 under a 5-year parole agreement.

Rapper Jay-Z branded Meek's sentence "unjust and heavy handed", and insisted he will "always stand by" the star.

Speaking to PEOPLE, Mill's lawyer Brian McMonagle said on Tuesday, 'I met with Meek this morning, and he asked me to thank his family, friends, and fans for their love and support'.

Brinkley has worked with Mill since almost a decade ago, when the rapper was convicted and jailed for eight months and later placed on probation in 2008 for gun and drug charges.

Judge Brinkley of Philadelphia sentenced Meek 2-4 years behind bars on Monday (Nov. 6) for violating his probation by getting arrested twice earlier this year.

More news: Suns deal Bledsoe to Bucks for Monroe, 2 picks

"I'm human. I'm not flawless", Mill said to Brinkley in court on Monday, according to a report from Philly.com.

A lot of fellow artists, including Jay-Z have come out in the open in support of the Philly rapper.

The sentence was unexpected as prosecutors recommended Mill not be imprisoned for the probation violations, mentioning he's been drug-free since January and has complied with most requirements of probation.

NY attorney Stacey Richman, who has worked with a number of high-profile rappers in the past (DMX, Ja Rule, Desiigner), was similarly shocked by Tacopina's allegations.

"Moreover, the charges that led to his current violation, were subsequently dropped and the stiff sentence was handed down despite recommendations from his probation officer and the district attorney", a passage on the site reads. The rapper could potentially be going away for up to four years, and considering the dubious circumstances surrounding his relationship with the judge, the general consensus is that it's an excessive verdict. In 2016, he was sentenced to 90 days of house arrest.

Share