Study debunks claims that Apple makes older iPhones slower

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New designs which were approved by the Unicode Consortium - an independent standards body for the image-based language - have been made available to iPhone and iPad users in the company's OS 11.1 update. The issue was iOS user can not send or exchange email from outlook, office 365 and exchange 2016 with its native mailing app. Apple reportedly confirmed that by informing the user that new update will resolve the issue. Apple might not be purposely hindering older iPhones to force users to upgrade, but it appears that optimizing each new version of iOS to work with these devices isn't the company's highest priority. So, what could be the major issue for the bugs with the new iOS update? However, with this new update apple promises to fix all the issue on hand.

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Gender-neutral emojis were confirmed earlier this year following calls to include non-binary characters to represent those who identify as neither fully male nor female. So, a lot of them are eagerly waiting for next version of Apple's iOS 11.0.3. Before proceeding with the update, make sure the device's battery is charged up to avoid interruption. It might be worth actually downloading the beta releases for iOS 11.1 just for the new emojis alone. In doing so they often get more complex as new features and technologies are added, which can lead to the app performing worse over time as the smartphone has to do more when the app launches and during its general operation. As for slowdowns, it suspects this may have more to do with new features that are resource-intensive and demand more processing power. For those who downloaded the developer preview of iOS 11 last June, however, the new emoji should have already arrived. Since Apple has been teasing the new emojis that will be coming, we expect the update to hit sooner than later. However, CPU performance did drop slightly over time, which the release said could be due to minor iOS updates, but likely wouldn't be enough of a change for average users to notice a performance dip.

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