President Trump Sees a Boost in Poll Numbers After Bipartisan Deal

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The survey carried out on United States adults between Sept. 14-18 found Trump's approval jump to 43 percent, up 3 points from August to September.

The president's popularity among Republicans was also up to 80 per cent approval, after a hitting a low of 73 per cent.

The 43 percent figure matches Trump's standing in the latest Economist/YouGov poll-the best top-line figure for the president in a major poll since June, per the RealClearPolitics average.

Republican pollster Bill McInturff, who conducted the poll with Democrat Fred Yang, said that although Trump's approval rating has steadily fallen since he took office, "job approval can go both down and up".

"It's impossible to attribute Trump's small uptick in the polls to any or all of these events".

"Trump's post-Charlottesville plunge proved to be short-lived, and his approval has stabilized", Morning Consult co-founder Kyle Dropp said about the findings.

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The NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll was conducted from September 14-18, reaching 900 adults via landlines and cell phones. "A key driver of this movement appears to be independents".

About 40 percent of Americans approve of Trump, while about 53 percent disapprove, yielding a net approval score of -13, according to HuffPost's aggregate of public polling as of Wednesday afternoon. Conservative support fell from 76 to 55 percent in the same time period, according to the poll.

Trump also ticked up Tuesday to 39 percent in Gallup's daily tracking poll, his highest result in that survey since July.

40 percent of independents approve, 52 percent disapprove.

What's more, 71 percent of Americans support his deal with Democrats Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi on hurricane relief and keeping the government open for three months.

August saw the president's widely criticized response to white supremacist-led violence in Charlottesville and his repeated heckling of Republican leaders.

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