Violence against Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar must stop

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"We are very much active in relation to the Rohingya crisis but unfortunately it has not been easy because the government of Myanmar until now has been completely deaf to our requests", Guterres said on September 15.

US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has used strong language in addressing the atrocities in Myanmar, referring to it as "ethnic cleansing" and "an abomination".

Almost three weeks into a mass exodus of Rohingya Muslims fleeing violence in Myanmar, thousands are still flooding across the border in search of help and safety in teeming refugee settlements in Bangladesh.

They protested in front of the United Nations office located in Shibuya Ward, Tokyo Prefecture while holding signboards and placard that stated "We Stand With Daw Aung San Suu Kyi". And we need to support Aung San Suu Kyi and her leadership, but also be very clear and unequivocal to the military share, power-sharing in that government that this is unacceptable.

Myanmar's state counsellor and de-facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize-winner, has been sharply criticized for turning a blind eye to ethnic violence.

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Violence in Myanmar has invited reactions from around the world.

UNICEF said on Thursday that about 400,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled Myanmar since August 25, some 60 percent of them children. Observers say the violence is being carried out by the Burmese military.

The refugees are fleeing a fresh security operation in which security forces and Buddhist mobs have killed men, women and children, looted homes, and torched Rohingya villages.

Prior to the current wave of violence, Myanmar's population of Rohingya was estimated to number about 1 million.

The Rohingya group fighting in Myanmar's western region of denied any links to global terror groups, saying they have no ties to any terrorist groups.

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