Gov. Martinez: Charlottesville violence a 'cowardly attack'

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At least one person was killed while 26 others were injured.

Kessler, a local blogger and activist, said in an interview Saturday evening that whoever drove a auto into a group of counter-protesters "did the wrong thing".

Two state troopers are dead after a Virginia State Police chopper crashed into a wooded area outside of Charlottesville, Virginia, the site of a deadly clash between white supremacists and counter protesters.

"The violence and deaths in Charlottesville strike at the heart of American law and justice", Mr Sessions said.

Attorney general Jeff Sessions said that the FBI's Richmond field office and Rick Mountcastle, the US Attorney for the Western District of Virginia, would lead the investigation.

"We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides", Trump said during a short statement, adding that he had been closely following bad events unfolding in Virginia.

The events on Saturday took place after dozens of white nationalists carrying torches held a rally in Charlottesville on Friday, where they were seen using Nazi salutes.

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James Alex Fields of Ohio's arrest was confirmed by the local jail superintendent and he is now being held without bail for the murder of a 32-year old woman.

Charlottesville Mayor Michael Signer also decried the violence and characterized the white nationalists as "outsiders".

He further said, "Our country is doing very well in so many ways". He said they are an "attack on the unity of our nation".

A gray vehicle with OH license plates hit a crowd near the city's downtown mall, killing a 32-year-old woman.

Trump tweeted a call for unity in response to the initial reports of violence.

"Angelenos and people everywhere condemn these acts of hatred, and are deeply saddened by the loss of life and injuries suffered today", Garcetti said. "Lets come together as one!"

The rally was originally meant as a protest over the planned removal of a statue honoring Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

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