Porn Affects Men's Sexist Attitudes And Playboy Lifestyle

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The team found that the younger a man is when he first views pornography, the more likely he is to "want power over women".

'The older a man was when he first viewed pornography, the more likely he would want to engage in playboy behavior'.

Bischmann and her colleagues surveyed 330 undergraduate men, age 17 to 54 years old, at a large Midwestern university.

On average, the men said they were about 13 years old when they first saw pornography, although some said they watched it as young as 5 and others said they were older than 26.

Each man was asked about his first exposure to pornography - specifically, what age they were when it happened and whether it was intentional, accidental or forced. They then asked the men to respond to a series of questions to determine their general approach to women.

Meanwhile, those exposed to it at an earlier age tend to want to exert power over women. But more research is needed to examine that possibility, they said.

The age when boys first see pornography may help explain why some young men become playboys and others seek power over women, according to new psychological research from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Some 33.4 percent said they intentionally sought out porn, while 17.2 percent said they were forced to view the material.

Still, the researchers say their findings suggest that viewing pornography could impact men's attitudes, particularly their views on sex roles, the researchers said.

Researchers Alyssa Bischmann and Chrissy Richardson, who both are pursuing doctorates in counseling psychology, said they were surprised by their findings. The most common form of first contact was accidental, with 43.5 percent seeing porn for the first time by mistake.

Bischmann said more research needs to be done, and explained that she suspects that the findings may be related to unexamined variables.

It could be that factors not assessed in the current study - such as the participants' religiosity, sexual-performance anxiety or negative sexual experiences - may help explain the link, the researchers said. "Six percent did not indicate the nature of the exposure", the study found. "We had expected that intentional, accidental or forced experiences would have differing outcomes".

The study, presented at the American Psychological Association in Washington, found that earlier pornography exposure was linked to an increased desire to "have power over" women.

Anecdotally, Richardson said she has observed sexual difficulties among clients who struggle with pornography use.

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