Tulsa officer Betty Shelby exhausted of 'pushing paper,' resigns

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Betty Shelby, the Tulsa Police Department officer who was acquitted in the shooting of an unarmed black man this past May, has resigned from her job at the department. She said her desk job makes her feel isolated from her fellow officers and the citizens of Tulsa.

Protesters march towards Tulsa City Hall during a peaceful protest honoring Terence Crutcher who was shot and killed by Tulsa police officer Betty Shelby in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. September 2016. Police Chief Chuck Jordan put her in an administrative role two days after her acquittal. She was not allowed on street patrol while an internal department investigation continued.

A judge on Friday ordered Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez, 54, back to court on July 21 with the hope that an open courtroom can be found in San Francisco to the start trial.

In a letter posted on the Facebook page of the Tulsa Fraternal Order of Police, Shelby said she's resigning effective August 3, 2017.

"I will continue to pray for the unity of our community, the safety of our citizens and our police officers".

"It is with a heavy heart that I have made the following decision".

Tulsa officer Betty Shelby exhausted of 'pushing paper,' resigns
Tulsa officer Betty Shelby exhausted of 'pushing paper,' resigns

She was charged with manslaughter and acquitted in his shooting death on May 17, sparking outrage from Crutcher's family and supporters. However, sitting behind the desk does not appear to be working out for her.

Ms Shelby's lawyer, Shannon McMurray, said she not sure what the 43-year-old will do next.

Shelby was on patrol that night and claimed she shot the 40-year-old father because she thought he was reaching for a gun, although police footage shows Crutcher had his hands in the air.

One minister called Shelby's swift return to the force "a slap in the face".

The suit seeks at least 75,000 United States dollars (£57,000) in damages and calls for widespread reform in the Tulsa police department, including mandatory training for officers on managing suspects with mental health or substance abuse issues.

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