State Plays Role in Big Medical Fraud 'Takedown'

Share

Nationally, the defendants announced today are charged with various health care fraud-related crimes, including conspiracy to commit health care fraud, violations of the anti-kickback statutes and money laundering, as well as crimes involving the illegal prescribing and distribution of opioids and other risky narcotics.

Dr. Jeffrey Campbell and his nurse practitioners, Mark Dyer and Dawn Antle, were charged with unlawful distribution and dispensing of a controlled substances and health care fraud. In all, the office's Medicaid Fraud Control Unity was involved with seven investigations that have led to the indictments of two companies and 15 individuals. They're also accused of fraudulent billing. The indictment alleges damages to Medicaid exceeding $175,000. The case documents claim Patterson was falsely and fraudulently willing Anthem, Inc., for autism services that were never performed while operating the JM Autism Foundation Trust.

In Indianapolis, Castleton Integrative Health operator Ronald Sheppard was indicted on charges of conspiracy to violate the anti-kickback statute and money laundering.

Kuhn announced nine people and two businesses face charges in the U.S. District Court's Western District of Kentucky, accused of illegally distributing controlled substances, identity theft, money laundering and billing for treatments that were either unnecessary or never took place.

One case involves Physicians Primary Care, which has locations in Louisville and Jeffersonville. The total loss to the Indiana Medicaid program has yet to be determined, according to the Indiana Attorney General.

More news: Listen to new Nine Inch Nails track 'Less Than'

In Fort Wayne, Dr. James E. Ranochak and two pharmacists, Brent Losier and Charles Ringger, all with North Anthony Pharmacy & Wellness Center, were indicted for allegedly conspiring to distribute and dispense controlled substances without legitimate medical goal and fraudulent billing.

"We're now in an era of white coat crime, people who've sworn an oath to do no harm, but instead they seem to ignore all the harm that they do", Kentucky Dep. Attorney General J. Michael Brown said.

Attorney General Curtis Hill says some $1 million in alleged fraud was uncovered.

"When licensed professionals and organizations target those who rely on Medicaid, they're also putting taxpayers on the hook. I applaud their efforts".

Share