Top Tories plot revolt, party tells May her days are numbered

Share

The election results are being perceived as a blow to British Prime Minister Theresa May, who called the snap election, expecting a comfortable win for her Conservative Party.

"As I reflect on the results I will reflect on what we need to do in the future to take the party forward", May said yesterday in a televised statement.

That the result of the British election has come as a shock to Theresa May is stating the obvious, but what perhaps may not be as obvious is the underlying message it has given to the Tories and its leadership.

However she said he, along with foreign secretary Boris Johnson, home secretary Amber Rudd, defence secretary Michael Fallon and Brexit minister David Davis would remain in their posts. Beleaguered British Prime Minister Theresa May was working to fill out the ranks of her minority government Saturday after an election that proved disastrous for her Conservative Party and complicating for Britain's exit from the European Union.

This scenario, in which no party has a majority, is called a "hung parliament".

To retain her role as Prime Minister, May moved quickly announcing her intention to pursue a partnership with the DUP, a small party from Northern Ireland known for pursuing a more socially conservative agenda than the Tories.

"I would have thought that's enough to go, actually, and make way for a government that will be truly representative of all of the people of this country".

While both seats were strongholds for the Opposition and were predicted to go to the Labour party, it was the strong vote share of the party which indicated a swing away from the Tories towards the Labour in the overall poll.

More news: Representative Steve Scalise's Condition Improves to "Serious"

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn had given the party "confidence" about selling party policies such as public ownership of the railways, she added.

After confirming yesterday that her top five ministers would keep their jobs, including finance minister Philip Hammond, May is expected to continue to appoint the government that will take on one of the most demanding negotiations in British history. Well, May is going to attempt to form an agreement with the 10 MPs that were elected from the Democratic Unionist Party, or DUP.

With 649 of 650 seats declared, the Conservatives had won 318 seats, short of the 326 needed for a parliamentary majority.

Sterling plunged against the dollar and the euro as the election result created even more uncertainty over the whole Brexit process.

Cameron assumed that the British voters would ratify Britain's continued membership in the European Union and thus allow him to silence so-called Euroskeptics within his own party.

"I think her position is, in the long term, untenable", Conservative lawmaker Anna Soubry told Sky News. Corbyn's Labour Party now has 261 seats.

May now risks more opposition to her Brexit plans from inside and outside her party, though a party source said leading the Conservatives was seen as too much of a poisoned chalice for her to face an immediate challenge.

The seven seats that were won by the Conservatives with the slimmest margins were Southampton Itchen (won by 31), Preseli Pembrokeshire (won by 314), Hastings and Rye (won by 346), Chipping Barnet (won by 353), Thurrock (won by 345), Norwich North (won by 507) and Pudsey (won by 331).

Share