Germany: no punishment for UK, but EU exit good for no one

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After nearly a year of waffling, Britain finally opens negotiations with its European Union counterparts on Monday about leaving the bloc.

But that entire approach has come under question following the June 8 general election in which Prime Minister Theresa May lost her centre-right Conservative party's parliamentary majority.

Still, the May's government said in a statement it was "confident it can achieve a bold and ambitious deal that will work in the interest of the whole United Kingdom".

"We want both sides to emerge strong and prosperous, capable of projecting our shared European values, leading in the world, and demonstrating our resolve to protect the security of our citizens".

May herself will also have a chance to update the other 27 European Union leaders on her Brexit plans at a summit in Brussels on Thursday.

Secretary of State for Exiting the EU David Davis described the talks as a mission to deliver on the will of the British people following the referendum of a year ago, Xinhua news reported.

"An overly blinkered approach focused on simply cutting immigration to tens of thousands and focusing only on high skilled employees could leave employers high and dry, especially those who rely on European Union migrants to fill low-skilled jobs", Davies said.

The process has created rare unity among the 27 remaining member states, whose leaders will be briefed by May at an European Union summit at the end of the week.

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Officials and diplomats in Brussels have voiced concern on the lack of preparation on the British side.

Speaking ahead of the meeting, Mr Johnson said: "We are pushing back Daesh militarily, but the threat we face is evolving rather than disappearing as they lose ground in Iraq and Syria".

May's letter triggering the so called Article 50 exit procedure is still the most detailed document on the UK's intention.

The EU official added that all the possible options regarding UK-EU relations post-Brexit were on the table, including the one of "no deal".

The government has developed a strategy of so-called "hard Brexit": leaving the European single market and the customs union in order to control immigration from the EU. We keep hearing that they don't want a 'Norway model, ' they don't want a 'Swiss model, ' they want to leave the customs union, the internal market, they want to limit migration. "That's a statement of legal fact", he said.

"If we're going to radically change the way we work together, we need to get there via a slope, not via a cliff edge", he said.

The chancellor said he would reject any deal "designed to destroy us".

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