58 people missing and presumed dead in London fire

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At least 58 people may have died in the massive fire that engulfed a 24-storey residential tower housing over 100 families in west London, police said today, warning that the number "may increase".

The Home Office has assisted Alhajali's family in "making arrangements for their travel to the UK" from Syria, and more than 85,000 people have signed a petition calling for his parents to be granted visas so they can attend his funeral.

Authorities in London said Saturday that 58 people missing are presumed dead from this week's fire disaster at a high-rise tower.

'Family liaison officers are supporting families, and that includes those people we know to be dead; some of those who are critically ill and sadly those people who we have been told were in Grenfell Tower that night who we have been unable to trace. He went on to say, "The tragedy we're seeing is because of the consequences of mistakes and neglect from the politicians, the council and the government".

Police have been struggling to come up with an authoritative list of who was in the building when the fire started, making it hard to determine how many had died. He asked anyone who was in the tower and survived to contact police immediately.

In a blog post written previous year, the Grenfell Action Group warned of "dangerous living conditions" in the tower.

'Whilst our teams have been from the bottom to the top of the tower, we must now carry out a full forensic and systematic search.

Other measures outlined by Prime Minister Theresa May following a meeting with residents at Downing Street on Saturday, included more staff covering phone lines and ground staff wearing high-visibility clothing so they could be easily found.

The recovery operation at the burnt-out block of flats has resumed and could take weeks, Cundy explained and May said she expected to announce the name of the judge for a public inquiry within the next few days.

Smoke billows from a tower block severly damaged by a serious fire, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 14, 2017.

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Those who lost their homes would be rehoused within three weeks, she said.

Around 70 people are missing, according to Britain's Press Association, and identification of the victims is proving very hard.

Officials are using dental records, fingerprints and DNA samples to try and positively identify victims. They paid their respects before the start of the annual Trooping the Color procession that marks the observance of the queen's birthday.

The Government has also announced that a minute's silence will be held for the victims at 11am tomorrow.

"Put to the test, the United Kingdom has been resolute in the face of adversity". This year, however, it is very hard to escape a very sombre national mood.

Anger was directed in part towards May, who failed to meet with survivors when she visited the charred remains of the block of Wednesday, and at the local government for failing to guarantee the safety of the building. "Some survivors have also complained the government has been painfully slow to find them places to sleep".

Earlier on Friday, the prime minister spent nearly an hour speaking to patients and staff at London's Chelsea and Westminster Hospital.

Experts believe the building's cladding, which contained insulation, helped the flames spread quickly up the outside of the housing complex. British officials have ordered a review of other buildings that have had similar renovations.

He said: "Little can compare in recent times to a tragedy on this scale - the response from the local authority has simply not been good enough". More than 3 million pounds ($3.8 million) have been raised for the victims.

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