Maria Sharapova says she won't request Wimbledon wildcard

Share

Maria Sharapova has opted to not seek a wild-card into the main draw at Wimbledon this year, choosing instead to try and win a spot via the qualifiers.

Sharapova was refused automatic entry to the French Open on Tuesday, with her ranking still too low to qualify by right.

However she has been granted a wild card for the Aegon Open in Birmingham in the build up to Wimbledon. "I am so grateful and excited to be playing this event again!" she said.

The five-time Grand Slam women's singles title victor announced today that she has chose to try her luck in the preliminary rounds, being played at Roehampton's Bank of England Sports Centre, of the tournament which she won in 2004 as a 17-year-old.

In the statement, Sharapova also said that she is healing from the injury sustained in Rome a few days ago, and that she will return to training as soon as she is better.

"There's always a lot of debate about who we give wild cards to". Sharapova's Wimbledon fate will be decided on June 20, when a committee meets to decide on wild cards for the main draw.

More news: Union: Up to 40K walking off the job at AT&T this weekend

Sharapova will also be at the tournament next year, with the event seen as one of the build-ups to Wimbledon. The British No 1, pictured, was facing the American veteran for the first time since March, when victory sent her into the final in Miami.

Russian Sharapova, the 2004 champion and former world number one, announced the news on her website.

After her French Open snub, Sharapova was granted a wildcard to compete in the AEGON Classic in Birmingham next month.

"I do not agree with is the basis put forward by the French Tennis Federation for their decision with respect to Maria Sharapova", said Simon.

Since her return at the Stuttgart Open the 30-year-old has won five of her eight matches but retired injured from her match against Mirjana Lucic-Baroni at the Rome Open.

She has denied using it for any performance-enhancing objective, and an initial two-year ban was cut on appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport, which concluded that while she committed an anti-doping violation there was "no significant fault" on her part.

Share