World braces for more cyber attacks as work week begins

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The VEP was established to determine whether the government should withhold or disclose information about computer software security vulnerabilities.

NHS Digital has recommended a number of measures for trusts to implement to protect themselves from cyber-attack after Friday saw trusts across the country targeted by hackers.

Security sources said they were working with Marcus Hutchins, who uses the name Malware Tech, and others to try to stop the spread of the WannaCry ransomware attack.

The culprits used a digital code believed to have been developed by the US National Security Agency, according to researchers at the Moscow-based computer security firm Kaspersky Lab. Transmitted via email, the malicious software, or malware, locks users out of their computers, threatening to destroy data if a ransom is not paid. Short of paying, options for these individuals and companies are usually limited to recovering data files from a backup, if available, or living without them.

In a snap election campaign which May has dominated so far, the debate over the cyber attack on the NHS forced her onto the defensive, although it was not immediately clear what impact, if any, it would have on her popularity.

The most disruptive cyber attack in the history of Britain's National Health Service propelled a debate over state hospital funding to the center of the election campaign on Monday, though officials said there had been no second wave of infections.

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In a letter to The Times, Sir David said: "Should Microsoft have stopped supporting Windows XP so soon, knowing that institutions had invested heavily in it (at the urging of the company at the time)?" In December it was reported that nearly all NHS trusts were using an obsolete version of Windows that Microsoft had stopped providing security updates for in April 2014.

"It happens that this attack is targeting the Windows computers".

Foreign minister Julie Bishop on Sunday also confirmed there was one business under investigation of a possible cyber attack. Doctors' practices and pharmacies reported similar problems.

Cyber-security firm Avast reportedly said it had seen 75,000 cases of the ransomware around the world.

At a hospital in Norfolk, eastern England, staff were told on Monday they could still only view x-rays in one room, while pharmacy services were being restricted as computer systems were upgraded.

RSN chief executive Graham Biggs said: "This is an extremely worrying situation for rural patients and for small rural practices which operate on a limited budget".

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