Paul Ryan warns against rushing to judgment on James Comey memo

Share

Ryan said that Congress will call James Comey to testify after the Federal Bureau of Investigation chief was sacked by Trump last week.

This information was reportedly disclosed via a memo that Comey had taken shortly after meeting with Trump, which led to a firestorm of conversation and speculation on Tuesday evening.

But the fate of its investigation hinges on Ryan's lukewarm support and the sometimes fractious working relationship between its Republican and Democratic leaders.

As for Mr Comey, whom President Trump fired last week, the FBI director wrote in a memo after a February meeting at the White House that the new president had asked him to shut down the FBI's investigation of Mr Flynn and his Russian contacts, said a person who had read the memo.

Ryan said House Oversight and Government Reform Committee had requested a memo reportedly written by Comey following the White House meeting, which came the day after Flynn resigned under pressure over his contacts with Russian Federation.

If you want to watch along to see what the House Democrats have to say about all of the recent news regarding Trump, Comey, Russia and more, head to this link to watch live at CNN.

"We need the facts", Ryan told reporters.

It's safe to say the pressure is on them as Americans watch their responses to the announcement of a special counsel for the Justice Department's investigation into alleged Trump campaign ties to Russian Federation and the fallout surrounding the firing of Comey.

"Impeccable credentials. Should be widely accepted", Chaffetz tweeted. And Cummings is wondering why Chaffetz "is not doing the same here?"

More news: Ford to cut 10pc of global workforce, report says

Chaffetz and Cummings appeared together in April to announce that they believed Flynn likely broke a federal law by failing to obtain US government approval to accept foreign payments and failing to disclose them afterward.

"Speaker Ryan has shown that he has zero, zero, zero appetite for any investigation into President Trump".

"I do", he said, walking away.

"It is obvious there are some people out there who want to harm the president and that means before rushing to judgment we (must) get all the pertinent information", Efe news agency quoted Paul Ryan as saying on Wednesday. "Instead, he appears to have minimized any oversight whatsoever", Cummings said.

Ryan said that the Oversight Committee "appropriately requested" the memo. Until Ryan signals there is a limit to what abuses he'll accept from Trump, though, calls for more investigations should be taken with some doubt that those investigations will yield anything more. McCabe has replaced Comey, who was sacked last week by Trump.

The Senate Intelligence Committee asked Mr Comey yesterday to testify before the panel in public and in private.

John McCain, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said late on Tuesday that the developments had reached "Watergate size and scale".

Mnuchin said the details are still being worked out, but- "One of the things we've done is we've proposed getting rid of nearly every single deduction, which is something that is used by the rich, in return for a slight reduction in taxes, and our objective is that 95 percent of Americans won't need to use itemized deductions and will be able to fill out simplified tax returns".

Have a tip about this story?

Share