Back to the ballot box: UK lawmakers back June 8 election

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British Prime Minister Theresa May (L) meets with President of the European Parliament Antonio Tajani at 10 Downing Street in London, Britain on April 20, 2017.

May, who reversed her position Tuesday, told leaders there was a "window of opportunity" to hold a poll before negotiations begin in earnest in June in departing from the EU.

After addressing a rowdy session of the House of Commons, Ms May won the support of 522 MPs in the 650-seat Parliament for an election on June 8, an easy victory for the Prime Minister who could see her majority increase by at least 100 seats in the poll.

Parliament will still sit for another fortnight, but party leaders wasted no time in hitting the campaign trail on Wednesday evening.

The Conservatives now hold 330 of the 650 seats.

A larger Conservative majority would act as a stabilising factor that would make upcoming negotiations with the European Union less disruptive - a point reflected by the resurgence in the pound after the British prime minister's announcement on Tuesday morning. Opinion polls give them a big lead over the Labour opposition, and May is gambling that an election will deliver her a personal mandate from voters and produce a bigger Conservative majority in Parliament.

She claimed other parties had tried to stop her "getting the job done" and that she wanted a larger governing majority to "remove the risk of uncertainty and instability".

The Prime Minister's spokesman said the Government was aiming to dissolve Parliament on 3 May, 25 working days before election day.

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"Following their conversation, the president considers that the real political negotiations on Article 50 with the United Kingdom will start after the elections foreseen for the 8th of June", the spokesman said, referring to the European Union treaty rule that regulates the exit of a member state from the bloc.

Tusk issued a set of draft guidelines late last month rejecting May's call for talks on the terms of the divorce bill and on a future trade deal in parallel during the two years of negotiations ahead of Britain's exit in March 2019.

Philip Dunne, MP for Ludlow, said the logic of holding an early general election was "quite compelling".

Britain is now gearing up for its third general election in seven years, which comes less than a year after the divisive referendum that decided the United Kingdom would withdraw from the EU.

May surprised allies and opponents on Tuesday when she announced her plan to bring forward an election that was not due until 2020. Labour said it will vote in favour of a new election, meaning she should be able to get it through.

The prime minister greeted Tajani with a handshake on the doorstep of Number 10, but the pair made no comment to waiting reporters.

The Liberal Democrats attacked the Prime Minister's decision to rule out taking part in televised debates ahead of the election.

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