United Airlines issues a new policy requiring crews to be booked sooner

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United Airlines is changing the way it handles certain situations with passengers and crew members on its flights, almost one week after a man was dragged from an aircraft in Chicago.

The new policy comes almost a week after a passenger, Dr. David Dao, was forcibly removed from an overbooked United flight from Chicago's O'Hare International Airport.

A spokesperson for the airline confirms that United has updated its policy "to make sure crews traveling on our aircraft are booked at least 60 minutes prior to departure".

One policy change implemented is for all staff, including off-duty crew flying to another location for work, to now check in for flights one hour before scheduled departure.

United chief executive Oscar Munoz on Monday again apologised for the incident, and the company said on Friday it was changing its policy on booking its flight crews onto its own planes.

Former federal prosecutor and criminal defense attorney Doug Burns explains the possible outcomes of a lawsuit between Dr. David Dao and United A...

In effect, this means that United employees can still take passengers' seats, but not once they are actually seated on the plane.

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The airline claimed it first offered passengers $1,000 to take a later flight - but there were no volunteers.

To say that United Airlines has not been having the greatest year would be a massive understatement.

Videos from witnesses that filmed Dao showed him bloodied and in distress after security forcibly pulled him from his seat and dragged him by his arms down the aisle.

When the poll asked if people would choose a flight identical in $204 cost and timing with United or American, 70 percent said American.

Other airlines probably aren't insane about this, either, as it going to focus attention on passenger service and treatment industry wide.

During the removal, which grew into an embarrassing global episode, Dao had two of his teeth knocked out, suffered a broken nose and a concussion and may require surgery, his lawyer said. The company said it was conducting a full review, and would announce the results by April 30.

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