Augmented reality will be Facebook's next big push, starting with smartphone cameras

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Zuckerberg, addressing developers at Facebook's F8 summit, said the camera would play a larger role in the interaction between members of the social network and encouraged developers to concentrate on broadening the capabilities of photography through new apps. Zuckerberg made his comments during Facebook's annual F8 developer conference in San Jose.

Augmented reality has been in the air for some time and got its first big hit previous year with Pokémon Go, a game in which users use their smartphones to chase digital creatures through the real world.

The social media giant is now betting on augmented reality.

Mr Zuckerberg acknowledged Facebook was slow to realise the potential of the smartphone's camera for use in augmented reality, which was pioneered by rival Snap, the owner of Snapchat, which innovated the use of filters and lenses for photos. This would be a more advanced kind of augmented reality than what is portrayed in the trendy game Pokémon Go.

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"I think everyone would basically agree that we do not have the science or technology today to build the AR glasses that we want", Zuckerberg said. Augmented reality will also allow users to leave notes for friends in specific locations-say, at a table in a particular restaurant-or let them view pop-up labels tagged to real world objects.

Last month, Facebook had introduced a new in-app camera with dozens of effects like masks, frames, interactive filters and guest art from visual artists that users can apply to their photos and videos. Have you noticed Facebook's new camera that is very similar to Snapchat?

Zuckerberg said launching an in-app camera was the first step in laying the groundwork for the new Camera Effects platform that was unveiled today.

"AR is going to help us mix the digital and the physical in new ways, and make our physical lives better". You are expected to impersonate a character that resembles your looks from a picture of your choice in order to do things together with Facebook friends online. These can also be discovered by other users in the Facebook camera. Zuckerberg said Facebook has "a lot of work" to do.

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