How serious would a conflict with North Korea be?

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"Nothing will be more foolish if the United States thinks it can deal with us the way it treated Iraq and Libya, miserable victims of its aggression, and Syria, which did not respond immediately even after it was attacked", a spokesman of the General Staff of the North's People's Army said in a statement on its official Korean Central News Agency.

Adding to Chinese unease, US President Donald Trump said on Thursday that "the problem of North Korea" would be "taken care of".

Wang last month urged North Korea to suspend its nuclear weapon and missile tests in exchange for South Korea and the USA putting their war games on hold, reviving a proposal first raised by Pyongyang. On Tuesday, he tweeted, "North Korea is looking for trouble".

He told the packed-out square: 'If the United States wages reckless provocation against us, our revolutionary power will instantly counter with annihilating strike, and we will respond to full-out war with full-out war and to nuclear war with our style of nuclear strike warfare'.

The parade comes as tensions have been simmering between North Korea and the U.S. in recent weeks, raising fears of a potential military confrontation between the two sides.

Vice Foreign Minister Ryol added that the Trump administration is "more vicious and more aggressive" than President Obama's.

Officials in Pyongyang said the country would "ruthlessly ravage" the USA if Washington opted for an attack in response to a North Korean weapons test. Counteractions would occur "in such a merciless manner as not to allow the aggressors to survive", the army statement said.

The North's leader said in his New Year's message that the country has entered the final stage of preparing to launch an ICBM capable of hitting the USA mainland.

North Korea's army vowed Friday a "merciless" response to any USA provocation but diplomats in Pyongyang are more sanguine, pointing out that the North raises its rhetoric every spring, when Washington and Seoul hold annual joint exercises that it views as preparations for invasion.

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An unidentified rocket is displayed during a military parade marking the 105th anniversary of the birth of late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung in Pyongyang on April 15, 2017.

Live coverage of the spectacle by North Korea's official broadcaster, monitored in Beijing, showed leader Kim Jong-un, wearing a black suit, in attendance at the scene.

According to AP, "The parade, an elaborate display of the state's huge power, involves tens of thousands of participants, from goose-stepping soldiers to crowds of civilians who have spent weeks perfecting their ability to wave plastic flowers in unison". He continues to launch missiles into the Sea of Japan.

Weapons analysts have suggested intercontinental ballistic missiles may have been among the military hardware presented during the parade in the capital of Pyongyang.

The display included submarine-launched ballistic missiles, believed to be the same type of missile North Korea fired from land in February.

North Korea showed two new kinds of ICBM enclosed in canister launchers mounted on the back of transporter erector launcher trucks, or TELs.

In 2006, Kim Jong Il, the current leader's father, conducted the country's first nuclear test.

"So you are saying if you feel North Korea is going to be attacked, you will use nuclear weapons?"

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